Jack Donnelly

Jack Donnelly was born in Portland, Oregon in 2001 but after a few years he moved with his family to Bloomington, Indiana where he grew up. As a twin, Jack always tried to be independent of his twin sister and become his own person, developing interests personal to him; the most prominent being his interest in art. Jack started with an interest in realism, drawing graphite portraits as detailed and true-to-life as possible, even selling pieces to friends at school for extra practice.

With an emotional drive, Jack let his heart lead his work, taking on darker topics like death and mental illness. Jack would surround himself with as many types of art as he could, taking an avid interest in researching musical art as well as designing and thrifting clothing. Jack drew inspiration from many movements and periods including, the postmodern movement, the surrealist period, the cubist style, and the neo-expressionist movement where he found great inspiration from Jean Michel Basquiat.

Jack excelled in the use of digital applications like photoshop and became the top graphic art student in his high school. This graphic art has become Jack’s primary medium.

“I have always been interested in how when you construct a figure it is considered art but at some point, you are imitating life. I think that everything is art, but I like to mix realism with more abstract styles to express the complexity of our world. This mixing of styles is my way of commenting on how fascinating it is that we have so many ways of expressing the same idea. I could draw a detailed figure of a man; blending shadows and highlights, measuring every precise angle, or I could carefully combine colors and circles and curved lines, with seemingly no meaning on their own, to create the figure of a man so the same. I have fun using both tactics, like painting while wearing mis-matched glasses; the right lens a piece of broken, orange-tinted glass from a bottle, the left lens a clear, clean-cut piece of glass from a microscope.”

Diva Armas Luther

Diva Armas Luther is a digital artist and illustrator, she creates colorful prints of varied themes.  

Having a graphic design background, her work is inspired by typography and architecture magazine layouts. She grew up with influences such as, late 80’s to early 2000’s Japanese manga, international haute couture editorials, and contemporary political art from her home-country, Indonesia. After spending more than a decade being in different countries in Asia, she found comfort in Bloomington’s art scene and is excited to bring her own culture to the colorful B-Town. 

“Illustration is my way of untangling the messy concepts in the mind and turning it into a neat and tidy theme. Coordinating colors is therapeutic to me. Instead of painting what I actually feel, I improve my emotions by beautifying them. Typeface plays a big role on that as well. The words I’ve chosen for my artworks tend to explain what I’d rather keep in private” 

She signs all the artworks with her name, but her handle is Komik Taksa. 

Instagram: @komiktaksa

Caroline Nurkkala

Caroline Nurkkala is a graduate student at Indiana University in the process of earning her Master of Information Science. When she isn’t studying, she is creating in one of many media, including making jewelry from animal bones which she acquires from animal carcasses found in rural Indiana. Caroline also paints, draws, and sculpts, and she is always learning new skills like armorsmithing and digital art.

Caroline voluntarily manages Artisan Alley’s tool sharing library called Burl & Ingot.

Instagram: @caroline.nurkkala

T. K. McGuire

T.K. McGuire is a local Indiana contemporary artist and advocate for Art Therapy and mental health awareness. McGuire received her BFA from Herron School of Arts and Design with an emphasis in painting and psychology. 

Continuing her education in art and psychology, she pursued research in the Art Therapy graduate program, and now dedicates her work to being an advocate for both art therapy and mental health awareness. McGuire describes her work as a process of catharsis and self-analysis. 

To McGuire, the creative process of bringing art to life is multifaceted. She uses the process to “find answers to difficult questions, peace when … feeling off balance, and a love for life.” She describes what she creates as “contemporary and symbolic mixed media art inspired by nature and drawn from my own life’s experience.”

Charles Culp

Charles Culp was born and raised in a town called Vincennes. After receiving his degree in Education from Indiana University in 2008, he joined Americorps. Since then he has been an advocate for non-profits and community education in Colorado, Tennessee, and now in his home state of Indiana. He is passionate about making a lasting connection with his art, and he believes every person has an opportunity to grow and thrive as they discover their passions through the never-ending, formative years of our lives.

“Color is a language more empowering and accessible than any word, written or whispered. Color can also be used as a tool to divide us when we fail to think for ourselves, and if there is a voice of fear that calls for division, then I believe in the simple, artistic symbols of love that remind us of a greater union; of a shared history.

We must forever celebrate the vividness of our experiences, so that we can find comfort in the universal road signs, forever guiding our many journeys. I design art to represent all people, sharing brightly between the tones and marks of the languages we have created.

My work seeks to depict the uniqueness and depth of the human experience, transcending culture and time, encompassing the many different ideas that have enriched the lives of the people of this world through their deeds and rituals. Bold lines form familiar, godly faces, piecing together the ancient symbols that raised our ancestors from darkness, and as the artistic observer surrenders their perceptions of control, they move toward the beautiful truths of compassion, understanding, and love in every piece they view. “

Amber Robinson

Amber

Amber Robinson is a local artist that loves trying different mediums and encouraging others to make something new. From stage management for theater to starting her own food truck, Amber now hopes to make it her life’s mission to help as many people grow spiritually, artistically and financially as possible. Stay tuned for new projects, classes, and chats with local artists and local entrepreneurs at the “We Came to Create Studio” page on Facebook. Video and Audio Interviews and Content Coming Soon.

Irene Wilde: Melancholy, Me

Irene Wilde

January 10th -31st

My work is my attempt to come to terms with feeling; that remarkable gift we are given and have always known, and yet continues to be an entity of which we cannot explain. For feeling is strange and terrifying in the sense that every human will one day hear a different inner monologue that is foreign and yet irrefutably their own.

Cathy Williams : Organic Truths

December 6th-29th

I am an abstract expressionist painter who creates non-representational works on canvas.  These works are alive with my organic and gestural movements

Charcoal and oil stick markings activate these canvases allowing my intuitive thoughts to develop and awaken.  Working with acrylics, charcoal, spray paint, ink, collage and found objects are the mainstay of my toolbox. Drippy splats and dribbles of paint lend themselves to the rawness of my work, allowing areas of clarity, coupled with looseness of form and detail to shine through the layers of acrylic.

I know the rules … yet, I love to bend or break them.

My artwork is intriguing, sensual and edgy, creating a visual question of what is real and what is left to the viewer’s imagination.  I describe myself as an artist who paints what I feel; and, my feelings, generally, take me to extraordinary places.  

I am dissimilar from the crowd and believe my works create endless dialogues.